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We All Looked Up

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3.61  ·  Rating details ·  16,038 Ratings  ·  2,725 Reviews
Before the asteroid we let ourselves be defined by labels:
The athlete, the outcast, the slacker, the overachiever.

But then we all looked up and everything changed.

They said it would be here in two months. That gave us two months to leave our labels behind. Two months to become something bigger than what we'd been, something that would last even after the end.

Two months
...more
Hardcover, 370 pages
Published March 24th 2015 by Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers
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Emily May
Aug 20, 2014 rated it really liked it
The best books, they don't talk about things you never thought about before. They talk about things you'd always thought about, but that you didn't think anyone else had thought about. You read them, and suddenly you're a little bit less alone in the world.

I didn't realise I was expecting this book to not be very good until it surprised me. And it surprised me a lot.

The cover is lovely and I think that might have something to do with why I was so drawn to this book, despite the description th
...more
Lola
Jun 16, 2015 rated it it was ok
2.5 stars, maybe? Another case of ‘‘great concept, poor execution.’’ And was it really necessary to have two guys chasing after the same girl? I didn’t see what was so special about Eliza. Yes, she was super pretty and super talented… but rather self-centered by moment. I love caring and considerate characters, two qualities she scantily showed.

Excuse me while I shudder with horror at how widespread love-triangles are in the book world.

Moving on.

Two months before an asteroid decimates your world
...more
emma
Dec 03, 2016 rated it did not like it
Hey, Tommy Wallach, Urban Dictionary called! They want to know if they can use the entirety of this book as the example of their definition of “mansplaining”!



If you don’t like that one, I also considered this: Tommy, my man, Ayn Rand called! She wants to congratulate you on using fiction as a vehicle for your beliefs even more than she did with f*cking Atlas Shrugged!


Hi, babes. I’m pissed.


When I read the first dozen-or-so pages of this book, I was thrilled. I almost unhauled this book and then f
...more
Melissa ♥ Dog/Wolf Lover ♥ Martin
I didn't really care about the characters in this one. I loved the idea of the story. Well, it would be messed up as hell in the real world, although at times I have wished this same thing would happen in real life. Yeah, I'm crazy.

But the story puts more things in perspective. Things I have been thinking about that isn't really important since the cancer diagnosis. It doesn't matter whether you live or die. You just need to do what's better for you regardless. We never know how long we have. W
...more
Charlotte May
Aug 15, 2018 rated it did not like it  ·  review of another edition
Ok nope. I’m out. I cannot wade through this shit any longer.

I was getting a lot of warning flags and bad vibes during this book, including:

“recognised the insecurity balanced perfectly between the push-pull of Eliza’s two protective shells: the bitchy attitude and the skimpy clothes. Or maybe only other girls could see it, like those frequencies only dogs could hear.”

“they associated white values with material success, while they seemed to suspect most black kids of being, at worst, drug de
...more
Giselle
Feb 12, 2015 rated it really liked it
Shelves: arc, ebook
I really enjoyed this one! I also liked that the ending was so.. open. Though some may not be a fan of that kind of ending, I found it to be the perfect choice for this story. Anything more would have made the book just a tad less... meaningful. Like, we're left with the wonder, you know. The "what if". I don't know, this makes sense in my head. *shrug*
Aj the Ravenous Reader
2.75 stars?

A very philosophical YA contemporary story in the eyes of four stereotyped teenagers, the jock, the slut, the slacker and the over-achiever as they face the end of the world head on when they were given only two months to live before the high probability of an asteroid wiping earth from the face of the universe.

Looking back at it, it kind of felt like a crash course on philosophy, particularly on existentialism- what it really means to live although this is so much more well-writte
...more
Anastasia
3/5 stars

Trigger Warning: self harm, suicide, rape,

We All Looked Up is a book about the world coming to terms with the world.

Before, we let ourselves be defined by labels - the athlete, the outcast, the slacker, the overachiever. But then we all looked up and everything changed. They said the asteroid would be here in two months. That gave us two months to leave our labels behind. Two months to become something bigger than what we'd been, something that would last even after the end. Two
...more
Steysha Kravits
Apr 18, 2014 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: 2015-favs
You didn’t win the game of life by losing the least. That would be one of those—what were they called again?—Pyrrhic victories. Real winning was having the most to lose, even if it meant you might lose it all. Even though it meant you would lose it all, sooner or later.
And so they waited, together, for whatever was coming next.




Oh, it's not a book, it's a life hack. Imagine that you all are going to die soon. What would you do? Would you live on, as if nothing unprecedented happened, or would y
...more
Jen
Aug 08, 2014 rated it did not like it
1.5 stars
To be completely honest, I skimmed the last 30% and I'm so glad I skimmed instead of patiently reading every word. The first half of the story was boring but alright, and the second half just went really downhill. To sum up the book in one sentence: everyone in Seattle goes insane due to the possibility of the world ending and random sh*t goes down because of it. Do not recommend.

No full review to come.
Stepheny
Gather round, gather round. *waits patiently*

Everyone settled? Jeff, put your hand down.

Ok, so now that everyone’s-

What Jeff? FINE. Go to the bathroom, but come RIGHT back.

*10 minutes later*

Finally! Can I tell my story now? Great. Here we go.

So, let me just tell you all this quick little story. I received an email from Goodreads. It was one of those Dear John letters that tells you about this wonderful new book that is going to be the Next Big Thing. You know the type.

In this email it said: St
...more
Elyse Walters
Nov 19, 2016 rated it really liked it
The news about Ardor--the Asteroid--seems to affirm, "why bother about anything?"

"People die. Everybody dies. Squirrels die. Trees die. Skin cell dies and the person you were yesterday's dead too. So what does it mean to die.?"

This is a YOUNG ADULT BOOK - which takes place during the senior year of High School. THANK YOU, *Trenton* for directing me to this book with your high recommendation.

In my opinion the strengths of this book outweigh the weaknesses.
The strengths are GREAT....
This is a c
...more
Taylor Knight
Apr 12, 2015 rated it really liked it
I really loved how well written and honest this book was. I didn't really fall in love with the characters but I appreciated them and I loved how believable they were.
I'm still blown away by how well written this book is. And for being a debut novel, I'm even more blown away.
A lot of this book reminded me of The Breakfast Club and I thought it was really interesting to see the similarities between the movie and this book.
Even though a lot of this book was slow for me, I still couldn't stop rea
...more
Sarah (Starry Night Reader)
You don’t wanna go out of this world with regrets. If there’s something you want to do, you do it. You take this life by the balls and you tell it that you existed.

I've seen this book described as The Breakfast Club meets Armageddon and I have to say it's pretty much spot on. This book follows the lives four "stereotypical" teenagers (the slut, the stoner, the jock, the overachiever) as they discover that an asteroid has a 66% chance of hitting Earth and wiping out humanity. As the world desce
...more
Aly's Bookish Wonderland
Ah, Jesus. So heartbreaking, with beautifully real characters, a plot with more twists and turns than a skatepark, and a question that will never be answered.

Full review to come on 100% Rock!







Pre-read: Strangely excited to read this.

YEAH!

Thank you, NetGalley and Simon & Schuster UK, for providing me with an ARC to review.
Aditi
“When you expect the world to end at any moment, you know there is no need to hurry. You take your time, you do your work well.”

----Thomas Merton, one of the most influential Catholic authors of the 20th century


Tommy Wallach, a Brooklyn-based writer and musician, pens his debut coming-of-age novel, called We All Looked Up that revolves around the lives of four high school teenagers when faced the apocalypse.


Synopsis:

Four high school seniors put their hopes, hearts, and humanity on the line a
...more
Figgy
Tommy Wallach and I discussed favourite birds, debated zombies, and perhaps discussed some of that book and music stuff over at 100% Rock Magazine!


“The best books, they don’t talk about things you never thought about before. They talk about things you’d always thought about, but that you didn’t think anyone else had thought about. You read them, and suddenly you’re a little bit less alone in the world. You’re part of this cosmic community of people who’ve thought about this thing, whatever it ha
...more
Claire Legrand
Jan 07, 2014 rated it it was amazing
I suck at writing reviews, but this book is The Real Thing. Gorgeously written, completely addicting. Honest and harsh and beautiful and powerful. I love these characters. I love this book. Tommy Wallach is one to watch out for.
Stacey (prettybooks)
We All Looked Up was the May pick for my informal we-actually-just-want-an-excuse-to-meet-up-and-chat book club and I was really looking forward to reading it. I've read a lot of young adult sci-fi but We All Looked Up is different – a mix of science fiction and contemporary, one of my favourite genres. I tweeted about We All Looked Up when I started reading it, saying it was The Breakfast Club meets the apocalypse, and I still think that's true. But our four teenage protagonists are confined to ...more
Giselle
The end of the world.. An asteroid that will hit earth causing the end of the world. With 66.6% percent chance of hitting earth, four teenagers are trying to find out what to do with the six weeks of life they have left.

Told in four viewpoints: we have the overachiever Anita, the slacker Andy, the all around golden boy Peter and the promiscuous Eliza. Having all four did provide an overall dimension to the entire story which I liked. But ultimately, I didn't really care much for Andy. He just se
...more
Tiff at Mostly YA Lit
Review originally posted at Mostly YA Lit

We All Looked Up is about four teens who are dealing with the impending death of not just themselves, but their planet and their species, by way of the asteroid Ardor. Peter is a jock and student council leader who is already questioning himself before hearing about Ardor. Peter has a history with Eliza, a photographer who has been labelled the school slut, and who is dealing with her father’s imminent death from cancer. Meanwhile, school slacker and joke
...more
Liz Barnsley
I loved this story – I’m a big fan of the post apocalyptic as long as there is heart to the drama, here we are “Pre possible apocalypse but no-one really knows” – its a genre all on its own. I’m sure that someone more creative than I can come up with a better word for it.

Anyway, here we have a fairly typical bunch of High School kids about to head out into the world, and as we meet them they all have plans even if some are a little disjointed. In perhaps one of the best opening scenes I have see
...more
Simona Stoica
Sep 19, 2016 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Recenzia completă: http://palarisme.ro/chef/carti/recenz...



„- [...] Nu vreau să vă sperii, însă istoria ne spune că ori de câte ori există panică, există şi moarte. Aşa funcţionează lumea.”

Timpul este una dintre cele mai preţioase resurse ale omenirii. Mereu spunem că avem nevoie de mai mult şi că nu ne ajunge, însă vina este parţial a noastră. De ce? Pentru că avem un talent înnăscut de a-l pierde pe lucruri lipsite de importanță, „pasiuni” de moment, în loc să-l tratăm drept ceea ce este: o in
...more
Ylenia
May 23, 2015 rated it did not like it  ·  review of another edition
Recommended to Ylenia by: Booktube
Classic example of great concept, poor execution. The premise was super interesting and something new but the result was just mediocre.
This novel had a lot of potential that was wasted.
I've been seeing a lot of people hauling this book but not so many talking about it and I can see why. It's just meh, okay.

I didn't connect with any of the four main characters, I thought there was no sign of character development whatsoever in the entire book.
To be honest most of them didn't feel like teenagers
...more
Kenchiin
Sep 22, 2015 rated it liked it
It started meh, and then turned into omg so cute :3
Gwen
Aug 09, 2015 rated it did not like it
There's some promising stuff in here, but way too much casual misogyny for me to get past. I think Wallach thinks he's probably super enlightened by calling out the double standard of slut shaming, but in fact his entire book -- in both the male and female character POVs -- reinforces rape culture in really gross ways. So much of the focus of the book is on men being entitled to women, sex/girls being something "winnable", and on women "actually having all the power" because they control their b ...more
Heather Petty
Feb 08, 2014 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: arc, owned, ya, favorites
I kind of feel like even if I use all the glowing words I know and make up a few along the way, I still won't be able to fully express how much I loved this book. But I'll try for fun...

I LOVED THIS BOOK SO MUCH. Like, so, so, so much. (I'm so great at this book review thing.) (Total pro right here.)

The short version: This book is touching and brilliant and profound. You should read it as soon as you are able to purchase it, with no excuses.

The longer fangirly version:

With four perspective cha
...more
Bert
Apr 05, 2015 rated it it was ok
I remember this one time the world was about to end and everyone was pretty worried and we were all partying hard and acting slutty and there was this one wise old lady that was fighting to keep it all together, then this girl shows up out of nowhere and she saves the day with her knowledge of Air Rights...oh wait, that was Burlesque.
Bonnie
My rating: 3.5 of 5 stars

‘Andy pointed upward. She followed the line extending from his index finger out into the dark distance. A single spark of bright blue, like a puncture in the black skin of the sky.’

Imagine if you had to grapple with the knowledge that there’s a 66.6% chance that the bright light hovering in the sky is headed straight towards Earth. Imagine if you were told that even if there’s a chance it won’t happen, if it does, you have only six weeks before it happens. What would y
...more
Kelly (Diva Booknerd)
http://www.divabooknerd.com/2015/04/m...
Heart achingly poignant, We All Looked Up follows the storyline of four teens all connected by six degrees of separation. Peter, Eliza, Andy and Anita's lives entwine as an asteroid is on a course with Earth. Peter excels at sports, he's the popular one with the stunning girlfriend, making them both teen royalty of sorts. But Peter isn't as happy as he seems. A little over a year ago, a tryst with Aliza in the school photography darkroom left Peter with w
...more
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the ending (SPOILERS) 5 165 Apr 18, 2017 03:18PM  
A Book Nirvana: We All Looked Up (September 2016 read-along) 19 18 Sep 20, 2016 04:27AM  
Country Side Book...: "We All Looked Up" discussion board 3 18 Feb 17, 2016 10:29PM  
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746 followers
I'm a Brooklyn-based novelist, screenwriter, and musician. I wrote "We All Looked Up" (a New York Times Bestseller) and "Thanks for the Trouble." My newest book is "The Anchor & Sophia," first in a trilogy set in a future North America which, for asteroid-collision-related reasons, has regressed to 19th century technology levels (oil lanterns, covered wagons, whiskey used as anesthetic, etc.). ...more
“The best books, they don't talk about things you never thought about before. They talk about things you'd always thought about, but that you didn't think anyone else had thought about. You read them, and suddenly you're a little bit less alone in the world. You're part of this cosmic community of people who've thought about this thing, whatever it happens to be.” 258 likes
“You didn’t win the game of life by losing the least. That would be one of those—what were they called again?—Pyrrhic victories. Real winning was having the most to lose, even if it meant you might lose it all. Even though it meant you would lose it all, sooner or later.” 66 likes
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